Closed – in colour, of course!

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What’s this?

This is the padlocked door of a shop, closed for the day, but through my eyes it’s a gorgeous palette of peeling blues and yellows and oranges.

I’ve been trying to work out what the word, in Hindi, in the top left corner of the photograph is. The first letter, one of my favourites, is ‘ka‘ (K), and the last is ‘la‘ (L). The single stroke in the middle is ‘aa‘ (a long A) so I think the word is kaal, which means time. The little curve above the line has got me puzzled, though, and I can’t work out what it is.  Hindi speakers – help!

Where’s this?

Nasik, Maharashtra  

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2 thoughts on “Closed – in colour, of course!

  1. Hi, I thought I’d help you out as I get curious about things like that too! The “curve” (which usually has a dot above it) means that the vowel is nasalised. So, some of it has to be said through the nose! I asked my husband what he thought the writing meant, and he thinks it’s “call” (as in English call). You’ll find that quite a few signs, especially on shops, say an English word but are written in the Devanagari script. To complicate matters, my husband also thinks the writing on the shop is Marathi (which uses the same script as Hindi). Aaagh!

    Here’s more info about the “curve” in case you want to read up about it. http://www.learning-hindi.com/post/913325626/lesson-24-nasalized-vowels

    🙂

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    1. Thanks very, very much Sharell, I really appreciate your response! I did a course in Hindi a few years ago and we learned the alphabet but I’d forgotten about the sign to indicate nasalisation. To be honest, it hadn’t even occured to me that the writing would be in Marathi, but of course it’s very possible given that the photo was taken in Maharashtra, silly me! It’s interesting that English words are used but written in the Devanagari script. Thanks again for your input, Sharell, it’s great to learn more 😊

      Like

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